Polish American Congress, Records

Immigration History Research Center
University of Minnesota

 | Provenance/Processing | Historical Sketch | Scope and Content | Preliminary Container List


IHRC 84
Polish American Congress
Records, 1935-1974
                   47 linear feet


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Provenance/Processing

The records of the Polish American Congress were donated to the Immigration History Research Center by Edward C. Rozanski on August 16, 1978, and supplemented twice, in March 1983 and on May 6 and 10, 1983.  The collection was processed by Anna Dorota Jaroszynska, University of Minnesota graduate student and a visiting research assistant from the Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland.  The finding aid also has been prepared by her under the supervision of Joel Wurl, IHRC Curator, who directed the project. Preliminary inventory prepared for the Internet by Student Assistant Ezalina Hamzah in 2001.

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Historical Sketch

I. ESTABLISHMENT AND STRUCTURE

    The Polish American Congress (PAC), founded in 1944, is a national organization composed of many Polish American fraternal, social, cultural, professional, veteran, and other like organizations.  It is also the largest Polish American political interest/pressure group in the United States.  Despite 44 years of existence and considerable activity in different fields, the PAC still has not attracted serious attention from historians.  There is no single monographic study on the Congress, and this gap is not filled by the occasional studies and articles fashioned in the context of broad analyses of Polonia history.

    The story of the PAC's establishment is strongly connected with wartime world politics concerning the existence of a free and independent Polish state.  After the Soviet Union joined the Western Allies in 1941, the circumstances regarding Poland became extremely complicated.  It was obvious that Poland, being in a difficult political position and with its geographical location, could be exposed to Soviet territorial and political demands.  In recognition of this, two Polonia groups decided to establish a new organization that could represent Polish American opinion and exert some influence on American government decisions on the Polish matter.  One group was created by followers of the National Committee of Americans of Polish Heritage (Komitet Narodowy Amerykandu Polskiego Pochodzenia - KNAPP);1 the other was formed by the three major fraternal insurance companies--the Polish National Alliance, the Polish Roman Catholic Union and the Polish Women's Alliance.2

    The constitutional assembly of the Polish American Congress gathered in Buffalo, New York, on May 28, 1944.  Expressing enormous solidarity and enthusiasm, 2,500 delegates, representing almost all Polish American organizations, created the common platform for joint political actions.  Charles Rozmarek, the president of the PNA, was also elected president of the PAC.  In his keynote speech delivered in Buffalo, Rozmarek formulated the two major objectives of the new organization: 1) "to cooperate to the fullest extent with our government in order to hasten the day of victory for our beloved America and her Allies;" and 2) "to express our unequivocal support of the American foreign policy based upon the Atlantic Charter and the Four Freedoms.  The impartial application of the principles enunciated in the Atlantic Charter will assure a just and lasting peace to all the United Nations, among whom is our first and ever faithful ally -- Poland.”3

    Within the few months following the Buffalo convention, the PAC organized its internal structure and created 33 state divisions.  The highest constitutional body was the national convention, which was supposed to meet every four years in order to elect executive officers and adopt major policies for the future.  The organizational work was carried out by the executive committee (the president, two vice presidents, a secretary, and a treasurer), which was responsible to the supreme council.  The supreme council, comprised of about 100 representatives of major organizations and the PAC state divisions, was to meet at least once a year.4

    Beginning in 1968 the PAC underwent several structural changes.  In 1970 and 1972 bi-annual national meetings were introduced, and the supreme council was replaced by the 31-member board of directors composed of PAC state division officers.  The board was expected to meet annually.  After the 1976 national convention, the executive committee was made responsible to a new national board of directors numbering approximately 100 persons, including representatives from the state divisions and from national Polonia organizations affiliated with the Congress.  This new body combined the functions of the defunct supreme council and the quadrennial convention.5

    The PAC organizational structure also included some other units, like the Washington Office, the Social Welfare Office, and the New York Information Bureau.  Next to the Chicago PAC Office, which served as the central headquarters of the Congress, the Washington Office was the most important and long-lasting agency.  Until 1969 the Washington Office was directed by Charles Burke, followed then by Casimir Lenard (1970) and Leonard Walentynowicz (1974).  The Washington Office took care of PAC business as well as that of the United Polish Press in America and the American Committee for Resettlement of Polish D.P.'s. Its main objective was to represent those organizations to the American government, the government's numerous agencies, embassies of other countries, and American mass media.6

    The PAC carried out much of its activities through the state divisions and the PAC commissions created to deal with particular problems.  Three committees affiliated with the Congress are worthy of mention here.  The first is the Committee to Stop World Communism, founded at the end of 1947 and sponsored by the Polish American Congress.  Co-chairmen of the Committee were Arthur Bliss Lane (former U.S. Ambassador to Poland) and Judge Blair Gunther.  Its main objective was to develop propaganda and educational programs directed against the spread of communistic ideas.7 Though the Committee was active only a short time, its goals and methods reflected the PAC attitude toward communism and Communist governments in Europe.

    The American Committee for Resettlement of Polish D.P.s, established in 1944 and dissolved in 1968, had a much more successful record.  Created in order to bring to and resettle in the United States eligible Polish displaced persons from Western Europe (mostly from German DP camps and from Great Britain [Polish ex-soldiers]), the ACRPDP functioned in affiliation with the PAC, using its full support and involving in its work the most prominent PAC officers.8

In 1961 the Polish Language Committee (Komitet Nauki Jezyka Polskiego) began its work to broaden the scope of Polish language education available to Polish Americans.  Wanda Rozmarek was elected its chairman.  As a result of the Committee's activity, a number of Polish Summer Courses were organized from 1962 to 1967.9

II.  ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    It is hardly possible to summarize all actions taken by the PAC during over 40 years of its existence.  Political positions of the PAC varied also over time.  We can, however, divide the PAC's history into two periods spanning roughly the time of  Charles Rozmarek's presidency (1944-1968) and that of Aloysius Mazewski (1968- ). With the exception of approximately one year, both men simultaneously presided over the PAC aid the Polish National Alliance.  Both presidents were/are outstanding personalities who exerted such a great influence on the organization that they were sometimes called "Mr. Polish American Congress."10

    Both Rozmarek and Mazewski were very active and energetic, organizing and coordinating the PAC work and representing its ideas to the public.  Exhaustive reports of their activities can be found in each issue of the official reports  from the PAC conventions.  Additionally, both the Polish press and PAC Bulletin/Newsletter document almost every presidential venture in detail.  The years 1944-1954 are covered by very interesting and useful PAC publications: Story of the Polish American Congress and Poland's Case in Press Clippings, Vol.  No. 1, 1944-1948; Vol.  No. 2, 1948-1952; Vol.  No. 3, 1952-1954,11 and Miscellaneous Press Clippings About the Polish American Congress from Belgium, Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Latin America, Portugal and Spain (Chicago: PAC, 1946).

    From the moment of its founding in 1944 the PAC began a serious struggle for the recognition of Polish matters in the world political arena.  A few months after the Buffalo convention, the PAC delegation was invited to the White House, where it was met by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.  The next year President Rozmarek headed another delegation to the formative United Nations San Francisco meeting, trying to represent Poland's cause there.  From the very beginning the Polish American Congress opposed the Yalta agreement and attempted to influence the American government to withdraw its support for the decisions of the Yalta conference.  In the fall of 1946 Rozmarek and three other members of the executive board of the PAC attended the Paris conference and made a 13-week tour of Polish displaced persons camps in Western Europe.  While abroad, Rozmarek held numerous press conferences; and in Paris and London he personally conferred with leaders and diplomats of many countries.

    The case of the Polish DPs staying in Western Europe, mostly in German camps, attracted much interest and effort from the PAC.  In 1948, PAC involvement in lobbying for a new law admitting about 205,000 DPs into the United States contributed to its enactment, even though the Act didn't fulfill all expectations ultimately.  Both the Committee on the DP's Matters (Komitet dla Spraw Wysiedlencow Polskich), led by I. Nurkiewicz, and the ACRPDP (from 1948) started bringing the DPs to the United States and resettling them here.  Meanwhile the PAC continued its efforts to obtain permission to enter the United States for Polish ex-soldiers staying in Great Britain, which was finally achieved in 1950.  The PAC also supported the similar activity of the Polish Immigration Committee, headquartered in New York.

    At the same time, the Congress struggled for recognition as a serious force on the American political scene.  During all election campaigns, President Rozmarek was approached by both major parties in search of his and the Congress's endorsements.12

    In 1947 the Congress welcomed in Stanislaw Mikolajczyk, the wartime prime minister of the London government after Sikorski's death and the Polish Peasant Party leader who took part in the postwar Warsaw Government of national unity.  Mikolajczyk's attempt to cooperate with the Communist dominated government in Poland was very controversial for most of Polonia.  After Mikolajczyk's flight to America, the PAC strongly supported his actions, resulting in the withdrawal of the KNAPP and Polish Roman Catholic Union groups from the Congress.13

    The PAC was actively involved in the investigations of Katyn Massacre.  The Polish American press frequently published related articles, and PAC leaders were speaking publicly on the matter.  The Congress paid $5,000 to support the American Committee for the Investigation of Katyn Massacre and also demanded a special investigation in the United Nations.  Thousands of petitions were signed and sent to the U.S. president to back that demand.

    The PAC was always very sensitive to affairs in Poland.  After the Poznan riots of June 1956, the Congress endorsed economic assistance and cultural and educational exchanges with Poland, initiated by the American government.  The organization was constantly agitating for international recognition of Poland's western boundary.

    Though the Polish American Congress never recognized the Communist government in Poland, its attitude toward the Polish nation underwent some changes.  These were explicitly expressed in the so-called four points accepted by the executive committee in March 1959, calling for the separation of the nation's needs (financial aid, cultural exchange) from the Communist government's business.  At the same time, the PAC maintained its basic position demanding 1) the return of the Polish territories included in the USSR, 2) free elections in Poland, and 3) recognition of the Odra-Nyssa boundary of Poland.

    In September 1957, the PAC organized a grand celebration of the 350th anniversary of Poles' landing in Jamestown.  The commemoration book Jamestown Pioneers from Poland, published at that time by the PAC, was a great success among Polonia.  In October 1959, thanks to PAC efforts, a Paderewski commemorative stamp was issued.  Later, in 1966, Poland's millennium stamp was also issued.

    Widespread activities in observance of Poland's Millennium of Christianity were initiated by the PAC in 1966.  In the years 1961-1967 six-week long summer Polish language courses were arranged by the PAC at Alliance College.  The courses were attended by many students from all parts of the United States.  The PAC has, through many of its state divisions, offered scholarships to young Americans of Polish descent to encourage study in such fields as social work, history, art, and journalism.

    Another action taken by the PAC was related to the question of keeping Polish language liturgy in Polonia parishes in America and preserving their ethnic character.  Petitions favoring language retention were sent to officials of the Church hierarchy both in the United States and at the Vatican.

    In 1967 Charles Rozmarek was defeated in his quest for an eighth term as president of the Polish National Alliance by Aloysius Mazewski.  A year later, Mazewski also gained the office of president of the Polish American Congress.  The 1968 convention of the PAC initiated many profound changes in the way of handling the Polonia business.  The new President stressed the need to focus more attention on American Polonia home affairs.  He also promoted a collegial way of consulting with the members of the PAC on important decisions.  Further, he expressed a serious concern for getting more funds to erase budget deficits.

    The next convention was convened only two years later, in 1970, in Chicago.  Mazewski's report presented at that convention summarized briefly the PAC's activity under the new leadership.  During those two years, the Congress underwent a serious reorganization.  More stress was put on the activity of the state divisions.  A number of commissions were established in order to deal with specific problems (e.g., Commission on Press, Radio and TV Programs; Commission on Polish Press in English Language; Industry, Commerce and Labor Commission; Commission on Civic and Political Activities; Commission on Polish Affairs; Polish Language Teaching Commission; Commission on Study of Polish American History and Culture; Commission on Polish American Fraternal Organizations; Commission on Teaching of Polish American History; Commission on Veteran Affairs).  The PAC strengthened cooperation with Polish fraternal organizations in the United States and also with Canadian Polonia.

    Two special actions undertaken by the PAC are particularly noteworthy: educational programs for the young people, preserving Polish language and culture as well as Polish American history and tradition; and presenting the true image of Poles, Americans of Polish ancestry, and Polonia to the pluralist society of America.  Emphasis was placed on true and thorough mass media coverage of Polonia matters, and anti-defamation action was coordinated by the special Civic Alertness Commission.

    The money necessary to put all these enterprises into effect was collected during a major 1968/69 fund drive.14 The innovations introduced by Mazewski and his administration were necessary because both the PAC and the PNA faced a serious problem of decreasing membership in the 1960s.15

    In the 1970s the PAC was forced to clarify its attitude towards Poland once again.  The Congress, through its president, emphasized the distinction between the Polish Communist Government and the Polish nation or people, whom they sought to help through economic and cultural contacts.16 The 1970s witnessed also a new flow of emigration from Poland.  The newcomers remained deeply interested in world politics but searched for contact with Polish American organizations.17

    The election of Pope John Paul II followed by the rise of the Solidarity movement drew special attention to Poland and Polish affairs.  The PAC supported the Solidarity union, as it had previously supported other workers' actions in Poland, e.g., the riots in 1970.  After suppression of the movement and the introduction of martial law in Poland, the PAC publicly condemned the Polish Communist government.  At the same time the PAC Charitable Foundation was formed, which by 1986 had sent over $80,000 worth of humanitarian aid (especially medical supplies and equipment) to Poland.  The Congress's officers organized meetings with Solidarity members and leaders in exile.

    The PAC story still -waits to be written.  Day after day and year after year the PAC activists and members add new, valuable accomplishments to it, sustaining their diligence and devotion to Poland and Polonia matters
 

_______________________________
 

1 Jedrzejewicz Waclaw, Polonia Amerykanska w Polityce Polskiej; Historia Komitetu Narodowego Amerykanow Polskiego Pochodzenia, (New York: National Committee of Americans of Polish Descent, 1954), 101-106.

2 In March 1944, those three organizations held a conference in Chicago of representatives of Polish fraternal organizations, clergy, and Polish press.  As a result, the declaration was issued announcing the common desire to convene a congress of the whole American Polonia.  IHRC 84, Box 3, Fol. 15.

3 Polish American Congress, Bulletin, 1, No. I (Feb 1945):7.  See also Richard Lukas, The Strange Allies: The United States and Poland, 1941-1945 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1978) and R. Lukas, "The Polish American Congress and the Polish Question, 1944-1947,"Polish-American Studies 38, No.2 ( Autumn 1981):39-54.

4 “Ustawy i Reguly Kongresu Polaczonych Organizacji Polskich w Ameryce (The National Congress of United American Associations of Polish Origin) Przyjete na Plenum Izby Kongresu Polonii Amerykanskiej w Buffalo, New York w dniach 28, 29 i 30 maja, 1944 r.” IHRC 84, Box 3, Fol. 16.

5 Donald E. Pienkos, "The Polish American Congress - An Appraisal," Polish American Studies, 36, No. 2 (Autumn 1979):9-10.

6 Karol Burke, "Sprawozdanie Biura Kongresu Polonii Amerykanskiej w Waszyngtonie," Sprawozdanie Prezesa Zarzadu Wykonawczego Poszczeaolnych Komisji i Komitetow Wydzialow Stanowych i Biur Kongresu P.A. w Chicago i w Waszyngtonie na Druga Konwencje Kongresu Polonii Amerykanskiej w Philadelphia, Pa. 29-30-31 Maja 1948, 81-106. See also next volumes of Sprawozdania and Protokoly

7 "Once Again It Is Later Than You Think" - a brochure published by the Committee, IHRC 84, Box 18, Fol. 137.

8 See the historical sketch of this organization in the introduction to the Inventory of the ACRPDP collection within the IHRC holdings.

9 See the records of the Committee, IHRC 84, Box 17, Fols. 132-136.

10 Pienkos, "Polish American Congress," 11-12.

11 The IHRC does not have any information about two other volumes that were supposedly published by the PAC.  See note on this in Prace Kongresu Polonii Amerykanskiej w Okresie 24-ch Lat Istnienia (Krotki Zarys Dzialalnosci) (Chicago: PAC, 1968), e (in the appendix).

12 Ibid., 17 ff; Lukas, "Polish American Congress," 39-53; Donald E. Pienkos, PNA: A Centennial History of the Polish National Alliance of the United States of North America, (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984), 163-165.

13 The PRCU rejoined the PAC in October 1954.  Pienkos, "Polish American
Congress," 18.

14 Protokol Osmej Krajowej Konwencji Kongresu Polonii Amerykanskiej, (Chicago, 1970), 1-43.

15 Pienkos, PNA Centennial History, 190-200.

16 Ibid., 21-22.

17 Ibid., 21.  In 1978, 11 of the 29 presidents of state divisions were from the post-World War II emigration.
 

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Scope and Content

    The Polish American Congress collection spans the years ca. 1935-74 but covers mostly the time from the founding of the Congress in 1944 to 1968.  The collection-measures 47 linear feet, the third largest of the Polish manuscript collections at the IHRC (1988).

The collection is organized in the following series and subseries:
 
 
Series I CORRESPONDENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL PAPERS
Subseries 1. Buffalo Convention 1944 (Correspondence and Applications)
2. Washington Office
3. PAC General Correspondence
4. American Committee for Resettlement of Polish D.P.'s (ACRPDP)
5. ACRPDP and PAC Correspondence with DPs and with People from Poland
6. Petitions re Katyn Massacre
Series II FINANCIAL RECORDS
Subseries 1. PAC Miscellaneous Financial Records
2. PAC Membership Dues
3. ACRPDP Income and Expenses Ledgers
Series III NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
Series IV DP's PERSONAL FILES
Subseries 1. Assurances for Named Displaced Personas
2. Assurances for Polish Veterans in Great Britain
3. Assurances by an Individual Sponsor (Refugee Relief Act of 1953)

    Bracketed folder numbers refer to oversize folders, to be found in the oversize boxes listed at the end of each subseries for which they have been used.

I.  The first series, CORRESPONDENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL PAPERS, is the most diverse.  It contains 299 folders grouped into six subseries, representing a subject division based partly on the primary order imposed upon the records by the PAC.

    The Buffalo Convention 1944 subseries consists of 73 folders.  The records deal with almost all aspects of organizational and political problems that arose before, during, and immediately after the founding of the Polish American Congress.  The PAC's genesis is detailed in a large amount of correspondence with organizations and representatives of Polish immigration in the United States; in texts of speeches, resolutions, addresses, and statutes accepted at the convention; and in documentation of its press and radio coverage.  Also included are anonymous and signed letters from opponents of the organization.  Forty-seven folders of this subseries contain applications for PAC membership ("Aplikacje a Mandat na Kongres Polonii Amerykanskiej w Buffalo," Nos. 1-1967).  The original arrangement of the materials has been essentially retained.

    Records of the Washington Office subseries span the years ca. 1944-1974 and include 58 folders.  This part of the collection was created by Charles Burke, the PAC representative in Washington.  The Office was established to represent PAC business before the US government and its various agencies, to provide coverage of the PAC activities to American mass media and, finally, to deal with complex legal immigration cases.  The Washington Office records contain Charles Burke's official correspondence with many American authorities and agencies, correspondence on individual immigration cases, miscellaneous materials relating to special political or cultural events and anniversaries press and radio releases, some printed records of congressional action, newspaper clippings, and ephemeral publications.  In general, this subseries covers the activity of the Washington Office in great detail, and its original arrangement has been maintained.

    The PAC General Correspondence subseries, consisting of 53 folders, documents many different aspects of the Congress's work.  It includes a great deal of the routine correspondence of the PAC, many reports and protocols, some press and radio releases, and other documentation of PAC activity in various fields.  Some of the materials were created by two separate units of the Congress, the Committee to Stop World Communism (records from years 1948-1949), and the Polish Language Committee and Polish Summer Courses (1961-1967).

    Other records relate to the activity of the PAC Chicago Office, Supreme Council of the PAC, Social Welfare Office, and New York Information Bureau.  Some of this material reflects official contacts of the PAC with Polish organizations in American and British Zones in Germany.  The records' exceptional diversity and wide date coverage (1944-1967) make this subseries very interesting and informative.

    The American Committee for Resettlement of Polish D.P.'s (ACRPDP) subseries within the PAC collection focuses on the four main aspects of its activity: 1) cooperation with different units of the War Relief Services-National Catholic Welfare Conference; 2) official contacts with the Refugee Relief  Program, the Displaced Persons Commission, the Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration, and the Polish Chief Chaplain in the Polish DP camps in Germany; 3) miscellaneous routine activity (primarily mixed with the PAC correspondence); and 4) wide ranging interaction with DPs--most already resettled in the United States.  The years 1951-1956 are covered in detail, although the entire inclusive date span is wider (1948-1963).  This subseries consists of 42 folders.

    The ACRPDP and PAC Correspondence with DPs and People from Poland subseries consists of 72 folders.  Though produced by seemingly two different agencies, the affiliations of correspondents interchange so much that the subject matter of this material serves as the key criterion of arrangement.  The records are divided into four groups: 1) correspondence with the DPs from the German camps-mostly requests and applications for immigration to the United States; 2) correspondence on DP matters--mainly letters to and from DPs already brought to the United States or people interested in sponsoring them; 3) correspondence with DPs or other Polish people (Polonia) from various parts of the world (excluding Germany); and 4) correspondence with people from Poland--mainly requests for financial aid or location of relatives in the United States.  The records, apparently somewhat incomplete, are arranged in rough alphabetical order.  Most of the materials date to the year 1949, when the ACRPDP launched its most effective efforts to bring the DPs to this country.  Correspondence on DP matters spans the years 1949-1957; correspondence with Polonia, 1950s; and correspondence with Poland, late 1950s until 1968.  This subseries is valuable for many reasons.  Letters from Poland show a specific image of life in America commonly held in Poland in the 1950s and 1960s.  Letters from Germany contain fascinating wartime biographies of individual Poles, sometimes enriched by their photographs.  Correspondence with people already settled in America depicts their first steps on American ground and their efforts to establish new homes here.

    On January 4, 1953, Charles Rozmarek, president of the PAC, delivered a speech demanding that the United Nations review charges of a Congressional committee that the Soviet Union was to blame for the World War II massacre of 15,000 Polish officers in Katyn forest near Smolensk in Russia.  He thanked the Congressional investigators and urged people to "flood Washington with petitions demanding that the evidence be presented for a thorough review before the U.N." In support of that idea, all the PAC divisions launched a petition drive.  Three volumes of those petitions (vols.  II, III, IV, 1953) addressed to the President of the United States, together with one folder of letters requesting the submission of forms, constitute the fifth and final subseries (Petitions re Katyn Massacre) of Series I.

II. The FINANCIAL RECORDS series consists of three subseries: PAC
Miscellaneous Financial Records; PAC Membership Dues; ACRPDP Income and
Expense Ledgers.

    The first subseries, covering the years 1944-1959, includes records connected with all types of financial activities of the Congress.  There are, for instance: financial reports of various PAC units; financial correspondence; expenses and accounts of particular conventions, board meetings, or conferences; payroll information; reports on money collected (e.g. Jamestown Fund, Pulaski Day Fund Drive, Million Dollar Drive, etc.); auditing reports; numerous check requisitions; and newspaper clippings with articles relating to PAC finances.  The records previously were almost totally unarranged..

    It is worth noting that a couple of folders contain materials on ACRPDP matters ("Roll Call for the indebted D.P.s", and "ACRPDP--Cases Not Arrived"), and some other records have only loose connection with finances (e.g. "Membership List, Lists of Senators and Congressmen", "Lists of the PAC Members in Power to Elect Their Delegates to the Convention in Atlantic City, N.J."). In accordance with basic archival principles, these loosely-related materials found among financial records were kept within the financial series.

    The next subseries, PAC Membership Dues, has a more homogeneous character.  It holds the records of membership dues for the years 1949-1952, collected from the PAC divisions of Michigan, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, and also Minnesota, Montana, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire.  This choice of states is not accidental, as they shape the "M-N state divisions" of the PAC; the rest of the records are missing.  The years 1956-1959 are covered by the membership dues records from Pennsylvania, New York, and partially by 24 other PAC state divisions.  Those records are also far from complete, but they represent a good sample of the total PAC membership.

    The third subseries is, once again, connected with the ACRPDP.  Nineteen folders contain ACRPDP Income and Expense Ledgers from April 1949 until June 1953.  They cover thoroughly the Committee's finances, further enriched by some other financial records and correspondence.

Ill.  The third series consists of 105 folders of NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS, spanning the years 1944-1950, though one folder contains miscellaneous clippings from 1935.  There are many articles, however, that lack both the title and the date of the newspaper in which they appeared.  The newspaper clippings were derived from Polish American papers as well as from the American press.  Their original arrangement and folder titles have mostly been retained.  This collection of records might have served as the base for the second volume of the Story of the Polish American Congress and Poland's Case in Press Clippings 1948-1952, published by the PAC in Chicago.  This series of the PAC collection is both very interesting and quite unusual.

IV. The last series, DPs' PERSONAL FILES, was fully generated from the ACRPDP.  The subseries division within it is based on a chronological order reflecting new laws pertaining to the immigration of DPs to the United States.  The change of regulations caused also the change of forms, applications, and all required procedures, as the records illustrate.  Assurances for Named Displaced Persons were issued under the Displaced Persons Act of 1948.  These sources are arranged in the chronological order of arrival of ships bringing DPs from Europe to either New York or Boston.  Arrangement of items within folders conforms to the lists of DPs brought on the identified ship.

    Five boxes comprise the Assurances for Polish Veterans in Great Britain subseries.  As a result of the special regulations of 1950, many Polish ex-soldiers from the Polish Army demobilized in  Great Britain were allowed to enter the United States in 1950-1951.  The records are arranged by numbers (1-3425) of the "Assurances."

     The Assurances by an Individual Sponsor relate to the Refugee Relief Act signed by the State Department in 1953. Within this group of records aare materials documenting the cooperation of the ACRPDP and the War Relief Services - National Catholic Welfare Conference, begun in 1955.  This subseries is also organized by the consecutive number of the forms.  These numbers appear to reflect a filing system for which, unfortunately, there is no key or index.

    All of the assurances in series IV contain a large number of forms, affidavits, questionnaires, applications, attached correspondence, certificates, pictures, etc.  The research value of those records is rich, especially for those interested in the DPs' story collectively.

    The PAC manuscript collection broadly and thoroughly documents the history of the Congress.  Both the beginnings of the Congress and the first period of its existence and activity, approximately until 1968, are recorded in great detail, providing researchers with useful and interesting information.  Moreover, the collection can also be used to reconstruct the early organization of the PAC offices as agencies producing records, which may be of some interest for the theory of contemporary archives keeping.  The full usage of this historical source will generate much valuable information and shed more light on the history of the Polish American Congress and the whole Polish American population in the United States.
 
 

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Preliminary Container List

Box No. Folder No. Folder Title and Dates
SERIES 1 CORRESPONDENCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL PAPERS
Subseries 1 Buffalo Convention 1944
1 1 Correspondence "A"-"D,"   1944-1949
2                         "F”-"M,”  1941-1948
3                         "N"-"W,  1944-1949
4 Miscellaneous Corresp., Feb.-April 1944
5                                     May 1944
6                                     May-June 1944
2 7 Corresp. before the Congress, March 12-May 27, 1944
8 Opposition, Anonymous Letters, "Cranks," 1944
9 Corresp. with Various Persons (Starzynski, Dingell, Wegrzynek, Dziob), 
May 1-Aug. 10, 1944
10 Karol Wachtl, Polish Star Publishing Co., Inc.,
April 19, June 20, 1944
11 Invitations for the Congress
12 Examples of Letters to Senators and Congressmen
13-14 Addresses
3 15 Conference of the Representatives of Polish Fraternal Organizations, Clergy and Polish Press, Chicago, Ill.,
March 4, 1944
16 Statutes of the Polish American Congress, Statutes of    Zjednoczona Prasa Polska w Ameryce (United Polish Press in America), Aims and Objectives of the PAC
17 Resolutions, Memorial to Pres. Roosevelt, Keynote Address, Other Speeches
18 Protocols, Reports of the Conference
19 Commissions at the Conference
20 Przeglad Radiowy, May 13-June 8, 1944
21 Correspondence with "Roquemore Films,"
June 1, 1944- June 10, 1946
22 Donations for the Congress
23 Some Misc. Financial Records
24 Pictures
25 Misc. Publications
4 26 Press at the Conference, Correspondence, Press Releases, Newspaper Clippings, Organizational Papers
26a Press Releases on the Buffalo Convention
26b List of Delegates for the Congress
5 27-34 Applications for PAC Membership 1-400, 1944-1945
6 35-42 Applications for PAC Membership 401-800, 1944- 1945
7 43-49 Applications for PAC Membership 801-1070, 1944-1945
8 50-56 Applications for PAC Membership 1071-1300, 1944-1945
9 57-63 Applications for PAC Membership 1301-1570, 1944-1945
10 64-70 Applications for PAC Membership 1571-1850, 1944-1945
11 71-73 Applications for PAC Membership 1851-1967, 1944-1945
Subseries 2 Washington Office
12 74 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "A," 1952-1956
75 "Alaska" - Homestead in the U.S., 1947
76 Assembly of Captive European Nations
77 Bargielska Michalina, 1959
78 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "C," 1952-1956
79 Clo Na Paczki do Polski, Feb. 9, 1954
80 Citizens Foreign Relations Committee, March 6-27, 1957
81 Columbia University, Polish Literature Chair, 1954
82 Congressional Committee on Communist Aggression
83 Czech-Polish Relations
13 84 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "D," 1948-1958
85 Democratic National Committee
86 Misc. Corresp. re Immicrants, "E," 1953-1958
87                                             "F, " 1955-1961
88                                             "H," 1949-1957
89 Immigration: General Information, Affidavit of Support, etc. (Blank Forms)
90 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "J," 1947-1961
91                                              "K," 1949-1961
92 Kwiatkowski Fraiciszek, Germany (includes 3 caricatures  of  PAC officials), July 27, 1949-Nov. 16, 1956
93 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "L," 1951-1960
94 Lozowski Josephine (Sprowadzenie Rodziny z Polski), Nov. 15, 1956-Feb. 15, 1957
95 Misc. Corresp. re immigrants, "M," 1946-1962
96 Majerczak Andrzej, 1953
Majkut Jozef, 1955
Maszkowski Jan, 1956-1957
97 Michaluk Tadeusz, Dec. 24, 1956-June 13, 1957
98 Milkowski Eugeniusz, Col.  Canada, Feb. 13, 1962-June 26, 1963
99 Mista Mieczyslaw, Aug. 24, 1956-March 11, 1957
100 Murnau Displaced Persons Camp, Germany, July 3, 1946-April 2, 1947
14 101 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "N," 1948-1957
102                                             "O," 1946-1950
103 O'Connor, E. M., Displaced Persons Commission, 1948-1950
104 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "P," 1948-1962
105 Podgorska Stefania (Immigration from Poland), 1960-1961
106 Polish Pilots: Szachogluchowicz, Kruk, Biskupski, Debski,1956-1957
107 Potoczak Antoni (Immigration from Poland), 1960-1961
108 Polish Y.M.C.A.
109 Misc. Corresp. re immigrants, "R," 1947-1960
110 Press Releases, Publications, etc
111 Ringland, Arthur - Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid, July 9, 1948-May 26, 1949
112 Misc. Corresp. re immigrants, "S,"    1948-1963
113                                             "T," 1947-1958
114                                             "U," 1949-1957
15 115 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "W,"1946-1959
116                                                    1944-1949
117                                                    1950-1954
118                                                    1955-1963
119 Wilson, Woodrow
120 Misc. Corresp. re Immigrants, "Y,"  1947-1957
121                                             "Z, " 1946-1963
122 Zablocki Clement, 1959-1963
123 Zajac Sylwester, 1953-1954
124 Zwiazek Polakow w Szanghaju, China, 1948-1949
125 Pictures
126 Misc., 1945-1949
127           1950-1974
16 128-31 Newspaper Clippings

 
Box No.  FolderNo. Folder Title and Dates
Subseries 3 PAC General Correspondence
17 132 Komitet Nauki Jezyka Polskiego (Polish Language Committee), March 3, 1963-Feb. 1967
133 Komitet Nauki Jezyka Polskiego (Polish Language Committee), May 3, 1961-Dec. 5, 1962
134 Polish Summer Course, 1962
135                                     1962, March-Aug.1963
136                                     - Payments, 1963
18 137 Committee to Stop World Communism – Correspondence,   April 5, 1948-April 9, 1949
138 Committee to Stop World Communism - Financial Records
139                                                          - Checks
140 Governor's Committee for the Refugee Program,  April 13-Aug. 27, 1956
141 Zjednoczenie Polskiego Uchodzctwa Wojennego w Niemczech, Aug. 19, 1948-April 4, 1949
142 Polish Union in U.S. Zone in Germany, Jan. 10-April 12, 1949
143 Komitet do Spraw Odszkodowad, May 26-31, 1956
144 Zjednoczenie Polskie w Niemczech, Rada Naczelna (British Zone), Oct. 22, 1948-jan. 14, 1949
19 145 Misc. Corresp.,  Aug. 10, 1945-Apr. 15, 1953
146                         Oct. 5, 1945-June 4, 1949
147                         April 1, 1948-April 3, 1959
148                         Dec. 8, 1948-June 28, 1955
149                         July 26, 1946-March 8, 1953
150                         Aug. 12, 1947-Feb. 4, 1963
151 Misc. Private Corresp., Feb. 12-28, 1948
152 Misc. Corresp. with the PAC State Divisions (Penn. and Ohio), May 18-Sept. 22, 1944
153 Financial Corresp., 1948-1950
20 154 Book Requests (Jamestown Pioneers from Poland), 1958-1959
155 Polish White Eagle Emblem Distribution, Feb.1955-Nov. 1956
156 Addresses - Envelopes, 1952-1955
157 Foreign Associations (Addresses), 1952
158 Delegates' Newsletters, Dec. 1945, Jan. 1946
159 Newsletter Mailing Lists (Addresses), April 19-May 4, 1948
160 Pictures
161 Misc. Newspapers, Paper-Clippings, Press Releases, Articles,  Speeches, etc.
162 Radio Address of Charles Rozmarek on the Fifth Anniversary of the Invasion of Poland, Sept. 2-11, 1944
162a Explanation notes for an exhibition, 1947
21 163 Financial Reports
164 Misc.
165 Sprawozdania z Dzialalnosci Biura PAC w  Chicago, March 15,  1944-June 8, 1950
166 Correspondence with the National Fund-Raising Services, Inc., Nov. 20, 1950-March 5, 1953
167 PAC State Divisions - Financial Records, 1945-1947
168 PAC and ACRPDP Information File
169 Mail, June 22-July 8, 1949
22 170 Press, Nov. 17, 1944-March 9, 1948
171 Newspaper Clippings
172 Misc. Press and Radio Releases, Misc. Publications
173 Protokoly z Posiedzen Zarzadu, Aug. 24, 1945
Wykonawczego PAC, Aug. 15, 1953
174 Assembly of the Supreme Council of the PAC, Washington,  DC, Nov. 17-18, 1950
23 175 Bylaws and Regulations of the PAC
176 Resolutions, 1944
177 Minutes of Protocols, ca. 1944-1945
178 PAC Publicity Program, Oct. 1, 1947-April 17, 1948
179 Chicago Office Reports, March 15, 1944-Jan. 12, 1950
180 Sprawozdania Biura Spolecznego/Social Welfare Office Reports, July 12, 1947-April 16, 1948
181 New York Information Bureau, Report, Sept. 12- Oct. 13, 1947
182 Reports of Charles Rozmarek, Aug. 24-Sept. 8, 1944
183 Press Releases, July 27-Aug. 7, 1944
184 Meetings of the PAC Executive Committee and Board,
June 30-Oct. 12, 1944
185 "Thank you" Letters from the PAC to the American Press,
Aug. 24-Oct. 5, 1944
Subseries 4 American Committee for Resettlement of Polish D.P.'s
24 186 Corresp. with the War Relief Services – National Catholic Welfare Conference (NCWC), New York (Assistant Executive Director; Legal and Welfare Dept.), Aug. 13, 1952-March 18, 1958
187 Corresp. with the NCWC (Chief of Resettlement Div.),
April 1, 1955-March 7, 1958
188 (Supervisor Option III Dept.), July 9,-Dec. 3, 1956
189 (Assurance Dept.), May 23, 1956 -Feb. 28, 1957
190 (Port Operations), Dec. 30, 1955-Aug. 12, 1957
191 Corresp. with Polish Chief Chaplain, R.C. (Duszpasterstwo Polskie), Polish DP Camp, Germany, 
Dec.10, 1948-April 7,1949
192 Corresp. with the Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration,
Dec. 22, 1954-Aug. 17, 1955
25 193 Corresp. with the Displaced Persons Commission (Commissioner and Chairman),Dec. 6, 1948-Dec. 29, 1949
194 Corresp. with the DP Commission (Chairman),
Jan. 9, 1950-Aug. 9, 1951
195 Corresp. with the Refugee Relief Program  (Dept. of State,Off. of Deputy Administrator), May 25, 1956-Nov. 27, 1956
196 Corresp. with the RR Program (Assistant Administrator),
March 30-Dec. 2, 1954
196 (Visa Office, Refugee Branch),Dec. 16, 1955-June 24, 1957
198                                            July 13-Aug. 15, 1956
26 199 Misc. Corresp., Dec. 10, 1951-May 4, 1955
200                        Oct. 11, 1955-Nov. 19, 1956
201                        April 24, 1956-May 5, 1959
202                        Aug. 31, 1953-April 6, 1959
203 Jobs for DPs, May 26, 1955-July 23, 1956
204 Money Collecting for DPs, May 22, 1949
205 Information File
206 Pictures
27 207 Corresp. with DPs     "A," July 19, 1952-March 15, 1963
208                                "B," Aug. 22, 1950-Nov. 17, 1958
209                                "C," March 26, 1952-March 18, 1957
210                                "D" (I), Feb. 28, 1952-May 17, 1955
211                                "D" (II), Jan. 14, 1952-June 19, 1956
  212                                "G," March 15, 1952-June 15, 1955
213                                "H," March 14, 1951-March 15, 1953
28 214 Corresp. with DPs     "J", "K," July 15, 1955-March 3, 1959
215                                "M" (1), March 21, 1952-Sept. 22, 1955
216                                "M" (II), March 31, 1952-Nov. 23, 1954
217                                "N," Jan. 5, 1952-Oct. 19, 1954
218                                "O," Jan. 23, 1952-Feb. 27, 1956
219                                "P" (I), Feb. 27, 1952-Dec. 1, 1953
29 220                                "P" (II), March 8, 1952-June 25, 1957
221                                "P" (III), March 14, 1952-March 10, 1955
222                                "R," Jan. 8, 1954-Nov. 27, 1957
223                                "S," March 24, 1952-Feb. 2, 1958
224                                "T," March 26, 1952-March 2, 1955
225                                 “U”- “W” March 26, 1952-Jan. 13, 1954
226                                 "Z," Feb. 24, 1952-Aug. 11, 1955
227 Pictures
Box No. Folder No. Folder Title and Dates
Subseries 5 ACRPDP and PAC Correspondence with DPs and with People from Poland
30 228-234 ACRPDP Corresp. with DPs from German Camps, "B"-"F," 1949
[294]                                                                          "B”-"D,”1949
31 235-240 ACRPDP Corresp. with DPs from German Camps, "G"-"H," 1949
[295]                                                                           "E”-“G, " 1949 
32 241-243 ACRPDP Corresp. with DPs from German Camps, "I"-"K,"  1949
[296]                                                                           "H"-"J, " "M, “
                                                                          "O, " 1949
244 ACRPDP Corresp. with DPs from German Camps, Misc., 1949
[297]                                                                           Misc., 1949
245 Corresp. with DPs, Germany, 1952-1955
246 ACRPDP Corresp. with DPs from German Camps.Pictures, 1949
33 247 Corresp. on DP Matters “B,""C," 1949
248-49                                    "D,"1949
250                                    "E, "1949-1952
251                                    "F,"1949-1955
252-53                                    "G,"1949
34 254 Corresp. on DP Matters "H,"1949
255                                    "I,"1949, 1952-1953
256                                    "J, "1949
257                                    "J,"1952-1955
258 Corresp. on DP Matters, Misc.,1949-1957
[298]                                               1949
259 Corresp. on DP Matters, Pictures, 1949
35 260 Corresp. on DP Matters "K," 1951-1952
261-62                                     "K," 1952
263                                     "K," 1953
264                                     "K," 1954-1956
265                                     "L,""L," 1952
266                                     "L,""L," 1953-1955
36 267 Corresp. on DP Matters "R," 1952
268                                     "R," 1953-1955
269                                     "S, " 1952
270                                     "S," 1952-1953
271                                     "S," 1953-1955
37 272 Corresp. on DP Matters "W," 1952
273                                     "W," 1953-1956
274 Corresp., Polonia, 1948-1949
275                            1952-1954
276                            1955
277                            1956
38 278 Corresp., Polonia, 1956
279                            1957
280                            1958
281                            1959,1968
282 Corresp., Polonia (No Response), 1960-1964
[299] Corresp., Polonia, 1949-1954
39 283 Corresp., Poland, 1952
284                           1956
285                           1957
286                           1957
287                           1958
288                           1959
289                           1959
40 290 Corresp., Poland, 1962
291                           (No Response), 1963-1964
292                            1966-1968
293                            Pictures, 1956-1958
41 294 ACRPDP Corresp. with DPs from German Camps, "B"-"D," 1949
Oversize Box 295                                                                           "E"-"G," 1949
296                                                                            “H"-"J,” "M,”
                                                                             "O, " 1949
297                                                                             Misc., 1949
298 Corresp. on DP Matters, Misc., 1949
299 Corresp., Polonia, 1949-1954

 
Box No. Folder No.  Folder Title and Dates
Subseries 6 Petition re Katyn Massacre
42 Volume II (bound) of Petitions re Katyn Massacre, 1953
300 Requests for the Katyn Petitions, Feb. 3-April 29, 1953
43 Volume III (bound) of Petitions re Katyn Massacre, 1953
44 Volume IV (bound) of Petitions re Katyn Massacre, 1953
SERIES II FINANCIAL RECORDS
Subseries 1 PAC Miscellaneous Financial Records
45 301 Dues of Delegates and Guests to the Congress, 1944
302 Income, Donations, Disbursements, March-May 1944
303 Roll Call for the Indebted D.P.'s, Feb. 16-May 5, 1951
304 ACRPDP - Cases Not Arrived, Dec. 3, 1948-Oct. 19, 1950
305 Tax Exemption, Feb. 26-Aug. 7, 1953
306 Check Receipts for Chas. Rozmarek, Sept. 14-Nov. 13, 1946
307 Detroit Supreme Council Meeting Expenses, Oct. 13-17, 1945
308 Correspondence with S. A. Gutowski, PAC Executive Sec.,
Aug. 5, 1944-March 1, 1945
309 PAC Financial Reports, Jan. 1948-Dec. 1949
310 PAC Financial Reports, Misc., April 22, 1948-Sept. 3, 1953
311 Philadelphia Convention - Petty Cash Expenses, May 1948
312 New York Information Bureau, July 1, 1947-Oct. 13, 1948
313 Chicago Office Expenses, June 1-Nov. 30, 1945
314 Packages for Poland Committee Expenses, Feb.-May 1947
315 Notes on the State Division Payments, April 12, 1946-Feb. 7, 1947
46 316 PAC Payroll Information, Jan. 8, 1949-Oct. 30, 1953
317 Jamestown Fund, June-Sept. 1958
318 Pulaski Day Fund Drive, Aug. 15-Sept. 8, 1952
Katyn Banquet, April 23, 1952
319 Million Dollar Fund (Check Requisitions), March 25, 1946-Dec. 23, 1947
47 320 Check Requisitions,   Aug.-Oct. 1950
321                                 Nov. 1950-Jan. 1951
322                                 Feb.-April 1951
323                                May-July 1951
324                                Aug.-Oct. 1951
325                                Nov. 1951-Jan. 1952
326                                Feb.-April 1952
48 327 Check Requisitions, May-July 1952
328                               Aug.-Dec. 1952
329 National Fund Drive, Nov. 1952-June 1959
330                               April-Dec. 1956
331                               Jan.-Dec. 1957
332                               Jan.-Dec. 1958
49 333 PAC Financial Reports, 1945
334 Financial Reports, Nov. 1950-April 1951
335 Misc. Financial Reports, June 30, 1944-March 1950
336 Drugi Zjazd Rady Naczelnej PAC, Washington, D.C.,Feb. 13-14, 1947
337 Membership List; Lists of Senators and Congressmen
338 Packages for Poland Committee (Addresses), 1947
339 Newspapers (Notes on the PAC Financial Reports), "Dziennik Zwiazkowy - Polish Daily Zgoda," "Dziennik Chicagoski," 1948-1950
50 340 PAC Illinois Division, 1952-1953
341 Inventory of Office Furniture and Equipment, Feb. 26-Jan. 11, 1949
342 Million Dollar Drive Reports, 1947
343 Disbursements, March 30, 1944-Oct. 3, 1956
344 Payee Remarks, Sept. 29, 1945-April 30, 1948
345 Convention Reports, March 1944-May 1948
346 Auditing Report, Oct. 30, 1950
347 Payments of 20% of Membership Dues to the State Divisions,June 1947- July 1950
348 Lists of the PAC Members in Power to Elect Their Delegate to the Convention in Atlantic City, N.J., 1952
349 Related Misc. Materials, 1944-1955
Box No. Folder No. Folder Title and Dates
Subseries 2 PAC Membership Dues
51 350 Membership Dues, Michigan,     1949 (I)
351                                                1949 (II)
352                                                1950
353                                                1950-1951
354                                                1952
355                                                1952
52 356 Membership Dues, Massachusetts, 1949 (I)
357                                                     1949(II)
358                             Massachusetts (West), 1950
359                                                                1951
360                                                                1952
53 361 Membership Dues, Massachusetts (East), 1949
362                                                               1950
363                                                               1951
364                                                               1952
54 365 Membership Dues, New York (West), 1949
366                                                        1950
367                                                        1951
368                                                        1952
[408] Membership Dues, New York (West), 1952
369 Membership Dues, New York (South), Nov. 1948-May 1949
370                                                         Oct.-June 1949
55 371 Membership Dues, New York (South), 1950 (I)
372                                                         1950(II)
373                                                         1951
374                                                         1952(I)
375                                                         1952(II)
56 376 Membership Dues, New Jersey, 1949
377                                                1950
378                                                1951
379                                                1952
380                             New Jersey (South), 1949-1952
57 381 Membership Dues, Minnesota, Feb. 1949-April 1952
382                              Montana, Missouri, 1949-1952
383                              New Hampshire, 1949-1952
384                              Nebraska, 1949-1952
58 385 Membership Dues, Pennsylvania (East), 1956-1958
386                                                            Jan. 2-Aug. 10, 1959
387 Pennsylvania (West),  1957-1958
388                                  1959
389 Pennsylvania, Misc., 1956-1959
59 390 Membership Dues, New York (Central), 1956-1959
391                             New York (West), 1956-1968
392                             New York (East), 1956-1959
393 (Lists), Oct. 13, 1944-June 25, 1945
394            June 25-Aug. 24, 1945
395            1959
396 Complaints, April 26-Oct. 27, 1950
397 20% Return to the State Divisions, July 1, 1950-April 29, 1952
[405] Reports, May 1948- July 1953
[406] Lists, Million Dollar Drive Lists,
ca. 1945-1946
60 398 Membership Dues, Ohio, 1956-1959
399 Calif., New Hampshire, Michigan, 1956-1959
400 Arkansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Missouri,1956-1959
401 Washington, West Virginia, Texas, 1956-1959
402 Rhode Island, Arizona, Massachusetts  (Boston  and West), 1956-1959
403 Illinois, Connecticut, 1956-1959
404 Maryland, Florida, Delaware, Wisconsin, Vermont, Oregon, 1956-1959
[407] Indiana, New Jersey, 1956-1959
61 405 Membership Dues Reports, May 1948-July 1953
Oversize Box 406                             Lists, Million Dollar Drive Lists,
                            ca. 1945-1946
407                             Indiana, New Jersey, 1956-1959
408                             New York (West), 1952
Subseries 3 ACRPDP Income and Expense Ledgers
62 409 ACRPDP Income and Expense Ledgers,  April-Dec. 1949
410                                                              Jan.-May 1950
411                                                              June-Dec. 1950
412                                                              Jan.-May 1951
63 413 ACRPDP Income and Expense Ledgers,  June-Dec. 1951
414                                                             Jan.-April 1952
415                                                              May-Dec. 1952
416                                                              Jan.-Oct. 1953
64 417 ACRPDP Income and Expense Ledgers,  Jan. 1954-Dec. 1956
418                                                              Jan. 1957-Dec. 1958
419                                                              Jan. 1959-Dec. 1960
420                                                               Jan. 1961-Dec. 1962
421 ACRPDP Income and Expense Ledgers,  Jan. 1963-Dec. 1964
422                                                              Jan. 1965-Dec. 1966
423                                                              Jan. 1967-Sept. 1968
66 424 ACRPDP Income and Expense Ledgers, March 31, 1951-March 31, 1952
425                                                             June 30, 1952-June 30, 1953
67 426 ACRPDP, Savings, Accounts and Taxes, Oct. 1, 1968-April 30, 1971
427 ACRPDP Income Tax Returns, May 1, 1949-Aug. 23, 1968
Correspondence, Nov. 10, 1965-Dec. 30, 1971
SERIES III NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
68 428 United Nations Organization, Jan. 1944-March 1946
429                                            March-Aug. 1946
430                                            Sept. 1946-June 1947
431                                            July-Sept. 1947
432                                            Oct.-Dec. 1947
69 433 Prezes Rozmarek - Jego Dzialalnosc, 1943-March 1945
434 Prezes Kongresu P. Rozmarek - Jego Dzialalnosc, March 1945-1946
435 Prezes Rozmarek - Jego Dzialalnosc od Stycznia 1946r
436 Sprawy Wysiedlencow Polskich Polish D.P.'s, 1947
437 Konferencja w Paryzu
438 Starania w Sprawie Niepodleglosci Polski, 1944, 1945, 1947
439 Obrona Zachodniej Granicy Polski, 1947
440 Konferencja w Washingtonie, 1944
441 Polonia Amerykanska
442 Sprawy Zolnierzy Polskich, 1947
443 Paczki do Polski
444 Konferencja w San Francisco, 1945
445 Polonia w Chicago - PAC Illinois Division
446 Prasa Amerykanska o Polsce, July-Dec. 1946
70 447 Prasa Amerykanska o Polsce, Jan.-Feb. 1947
448                                              March-June 1947
449                                              July-Sept. 1947,
                                             Oct.-Dec. 1947
450 Obchody Dnia Pulaskiego, 1944-1947
451                                        1947-1948
71 452 The Voice of America, 1943-April 1945
453                                  May 1945-Nov. 1946
454 S.P. Jan Przyprawa
455 Piata Rocznica Wybuchu Wojny, 1944-1946
456 Rzad Polski w Londynie, 1943-1944
457                                     Jan.-June 1945
458                                     1948
72 459 List Otwarty Dziennikarzy Polskich do Dziennikarzy Amerykanskich, 1945
460 Zjazd Rady Naczelnej w Washingtonie, 12 Stycznia 1945
461 Kongres Polonii - Prasa Polska od Marca 1947 do Kwietnia 1947
462 Kongres Polonii - Prasa Polska od Maja do Sierpnia 1947
463 Kongres Polonii - Prasa Polska od Wrzesnia do Pazdziernika 1947
464 Kongres Polonii - Prasa Polska od Listopada 1947-Stycznia 1948
465 Warsaw-Lublin Government, Jan.-July 1945
73 466 Warsaw-Lublin Government, Sept. 1945-Jan. 1947
467-68 Zjazd Rady Naczelnej Kongresu Polonii w Detroit, Oct. 11-12,1945
469 Rzad Polski w Lublinie
470 Sieroty Wojenne z Santa Rosa, Mexico i z Indii - Polish Press
471 Sieroty Wojenne z Santa Rosa, Mexico i z Indii - American and Polish Press
472 Million Dollar Drive - American Press
473 Million Dollar Campaign - Polish American Congress
474 Sieroty Polskie
74 475 Voice of Britain
476 Voice of America, Jan. 1947
477 United Nations Organization, Jan. 1, 1948
478 Zjednoczona Prasa Polska, Jan.-April 1948
479                                         May-Sept. 1948
480 Zjednoczona Prasa Polska, Jan.-March 1948
481 Prasa Amerykanska o Polsce, July-Sept. 1948
482 Wolowska Honorata
483 Peter Yolles
75 484 Zjazd Rady Naczelnej, Feb. 13-14, 1947, Feb. 1948
485 Warsaw Government, Jan. 1947
486                                 1947-1948
487 Warszawa, 1944-1945
488                  1945-1948
489 Obchody Konstytucji 3-go Maja, 1948
76 490-91 American Press - Letters
492-94 Million Dollar Campaign - PAC
495-96 Political Situation in the World
77 497 Prezes Rozmarek - Jego Dzialalnosc, od Jan. 1947
498 Rocznice - Obchody
499 Prasa Amerykanska o Polsce, Oct. 1948
500 60-Lecie Dziennika Chicagowskiego, 1950
501 Zjazd Rady Naczelnej Kongresu Polonii Amerykanskiej, 1950
502 70-Lecie Zwiazku Narodowego Polskiego, 1950
503 50-Lecie Rowno-uprawnienia Kobiet, 1950
78 504 Misc. #1 (Polish Constitution Day)
505-07 Misc. #2-#4
508 Misc. #5 (Food Situation in Poland)
509-10 Misc. #6-#7
79 511-14 Misc. #8-#ll
515 P. Machrowicz
516 Misc.,  1935
517            1941
518            1942
519            1943
520            1943
80 521 Misc.,  1944
522            1945
523            1946
524            1946-1948
525            1946-1948
526            1948
527            1949
528            1949
81 529 Mikolajczyk Stanislaw, Voice of America - News Items
530 A. Bliss Lane - Byly Ambasador Amerykanski w Warszawie
531 Misc., 1940
532 Kobiety Z.N.P. Rowno-uprawnienie, 1940
533 60-Lecie Z.N.P., 1940
534 Dziennik Chicagowski - 70-Lecie
535 Smerc Gen.  Sikorskiego, 1943
536 Jan Karasiewicz

 
Box No. Folder No. Folder Title and Dates
SERIES IV DP's PERSONAL FILES
Subseries 1 Assurances for Named Displaced Persons
82 537 General Heintzelman, New York, June 16, 1949
538 Gen. Muir, Boston, June 16, 1949
539 Gen. Ballou, New York, June 17, 1949
540 Marine Jumper, New York, June 23, 1949
541 Gen. Hersey, New York, June 27, 1949
542 Gen. Holbrook, New York, July 2, 1949
543 Gen. Howze, New York, July 3, 1949
544 Gen. Haan, New York, July 5, 1949
545 Gen. Blatchford (also "Blanchford"), Boston, July 7, 1949
546 Gen. Sturgis, Boston, July 8, 1949
83 547 Gen. Marlin, New York, July 17, 1949
548 Gen. Eltinge, Boston, July 18, 1949
549 Marine Jumper, New York, July 19, 1949
550 Gen. Ballou, New York, July 20, 1949
551 Gen. Heintzelman, Boston, July 22, 1949
552 Gen. Muir, New York, July 29, 1949
553 Gen. Howze, New York, Aug. 9, 1949
84 554 Gen. Heintzelman, New York, Aug. 14, 1949
555 Gen. Sturgis, Boston, Aug. 14, 1949
556 Marine Marlin, New York, Aug. 20, 1949
557 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Aug. 22, 1949
558 Gen. Muir, New York, Aug. 23, 1949
559 Gen. Hersey, Boston, Aug. 27, 1949
85 560 Gen. Bundy, New York, Aug. 30, 1949
561 Gen. Holbrook, Boston, Aug. 30, 1949
562 Gen. Haan, New York, Aug. 31, 1949
563 Gen. McRae (also "McCrae"), New York, Sept. 3, 1949
564 Gen. Stewart, New York, Sept. 4, 1949
565 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Sept. 6, 1949
566 Gen. Muir, New York, Sept. 17, 1949
86 567-68 Gen. Hersey, New York, Sept. 19, 1949
569 Gen. Holbrook, Boston, Sept. 22, 1949
570 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Sept. 24, 1949
571 Gen. Haan, New York, Sept. 26, 1949
572 Gen. McRae, New York, Sept. 28, 1949
87 573 Gen. Heintzelman, Boston, Oct. 1, 1949
574 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Oct. 1, 1949
575 Gen. Howze, New York, Oct. 4, 1949
576 Gen. Ballou, New York, Oct. 5, 1949
577-78 Gen. Muir, New York, Oct. 11, 1949
88 579 Gen. Stewart, New York, Oct. 13, 1949
580 Gen. Taylor, New York, Oct. 13, 1949
581 Gen. Hersey, Boston, Oct. 14, 1949
582 Gen. Black, New York, Oct. 19, 1949
583 Gen. McRae, New York, Oct. 24, 1949
89 584 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Oct. 25, 1949
585 Gen. Bundy, New York, Oct. 27, 1949
586 Gen. Howze, New York, Oct. 28, 1949
587 Gen. Stewart, New York, Nov. 8, 1949
588 Gen. Muir, New York, Nov. 9, 1949
90 589 Gen. McRae, New York, Nov. 23, 1949
590 Gen. Ballou, New York, Nov. 28, 1949
591 Gen. Sturgis, Boston, Nov. 28, 1949
592 Gen. Muir, Boston, Dec. 2, 1949
593 Gen. Taylor, New York, Dec. 9, 1949
594 Gen. Stewart, New York, Dec. 13, 1949
91 595 Gen. McRae, New York, Dec. 16, 1949
596 Gen. Greely, New York, Dec. 22, 1949
597 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Dec. 23, 1949
598 Gen. Heintzelman, New York, Jan. 13, 1950
599 Gen. Muir, New York, Jan. 19, 1950
600 Gen. McRae, New York, Jan. 26, 1950
92 601 Gen. Hersey, New Orleans, Jan. 30, 1950
602 Gen. Greely, New York, Feb. 1, 1950
603 Gen. Howze, New York, Feb. 3, 1950
604 Gen. Black, New York, Feb. 18, 1950
605 Gen. McRae, New York-New Orleans, Feb. 19, 1950
606 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Feb. 20, 1950
607 Gen. Greely, New York, March 3, 1950
93 608 Gen. Hersey, New York, March 9, 1950
609 Gen. McRae, New York, March 23, 1950
610 Gen. Blatchford, New York, April 4, 1950
611 Gen. Haan, New York, April 5, 1950
612 Gen. Langfitt (also "Langfit"), New York, April 10, 1950
613 Gen. Taylor, New York, April 18, 1950
614 Gen. McRae, New York, April 22, 1950
615 Gen. Heintzelman, Boston, April 24, 1950
94 616 Gen. Blatchford, New York, May 3, 1950
617 Gen. Muir, New York, May 6, 1950
618 Gen. Haan, New York, May 8, 1950
619-20 Gen. Ballou, New York, May 14, 1950
621 Gen. Howze, New York, May 15, 1950
622 Gen. Blatchford, Boston, May 25, 1950
623 Gen. Heintzelman, New York, May 31, 1950
95 624 Gen. Black, New York, June 1, 1950
625 Gen. Haan, New Orleans, June 7, 1950
626-27 Gen. Stewart, New York, June 8, 1950
628 Gen. Sturgis, Boston, June 8, 1950
629 Gen. Hersey, New York, June 15, 1950
96 630 Gen. Howze, New York, June 15, 1950
631 Gen. Ballou, Boston, June 19, 1950
632 Gen. Blatchford, New York, June 24, 1950
633 Gen. Heintzelman, New York, June 26, 1950
634 Gen. Black, New York, June 30, 1950
635 Gen. McRae, New York, July 7, 1950
636 Gen. Greely, New Orleans-New York, July 11, 1950

 
Box No. Folder No. Folder Title and Dates
97 637 Gen. Sturgis, New York, July 12, 1950
638 Gen. Taylor, New York, July 17, 1950
639 Gen. Hersey, Boston, July 22, 1950
640 Gen. Haan, New York, July 26, 1950
641 Gen. McRae, New York, Dec. 11, 1950
642-43 Gen. Stewart, New York, Dec. 12, 1950
98 644-46 Gen. Muir, New York, Dec. 13, 1950
647 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Dec. 19, 1950
648-49 Gen. Ballou, New York, Dec. 21, 1950
99 650-51 Gen. Ballou, New York, Dec. 21, 1950
652 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Dec. 22, 1950
653 Gen. Langfit, New Orleans, Dec. 27, 1950
654-55 Gen. Taylor, New York, Dec. 28, 1950
100 656-58 Gen. Stewart, New York, Jan. 13, 1951
659-61 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Jan. 13, 1951
101 662 Gen. Ballou, New York, Jan. 20, 1951
663-65 Gen. Muir, New York, Jan. 20, 1951
666-67 Gen. Taylor, New York, Jan. 22, 1951
668 Gen. Langfit, New York, Jan. 24, 1951
102 669 Gen. McRae, New York, Jan. 29, 1951
670 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Jan. 31, 1951
671-72 Gen. Stewart, New York, Feb. 12, 1951
673-74 Gen. Muir, New York, Feb. 16, 1951
103 675-76 Gen. Sturgis, New York and New Orleans, Feb. 18, 1951
677 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Feb. 26, 1951
678-79 Gen. Taylor, New York, March 3, 1951
680 Gen. Taylor, New York, April 3, 1951
681 Gen. Stewart, New York, April 7, 1951
682 Gen. Muir, New York, April 10, 1951
104 683 Gen. Sturgis, New York, April 20, 1951
684 Gen. Blatchford, New York, April 26, 1951
685-86 Gen. Stewart, New York, May 2,1951
687 Gen. Taylor, New York, May 5, 1951 (1)
688 Gen. Kolpak Jan Case, New Orleans, May 5, 1951
689 Gen. Taylor, New York, May 5, 1951 (II)
105 690-91 Gen. Muir, New York, May 17, 1951
692-93 Gen. Sturgis, New York, May 23, 1951
694 Gen. Blatchford, New York, May 29, 1951
695-96 Gen. Taylor, New York, June 1, 1951
106 697697 Gen. Stewart, New York, June 2, 1951
698-99 Gen. Muir, New Orleans, June 14, 1951
700-01 Gen. Sturgis, New York, June 16, 1951
702 Gen. Blatchford, New York, June 23, 1951
107 703-04 Gen. Stewart, New York, June 27, 1951
705 Gen. Ballou, New York, June 29, 1951
706 Gen. Taylor, New York, June 29, 1951
707 Gen.Sturgis, New York, July 11, 1951
708-09 Gen. Muir, New Orleans, July 18, 1951
108 710 Gen. Blatchford, New York, July 30, 1951
711 Gen. Stewart, New York, Aug. 4, 1951
712 Gen. Taylor, New York, Aug. 6, 1951
713 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Aug. 17, 1951
714 Gen. Muir, New York, Aug. 18, 1951
715 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Aug. 24, 1951
716 Gen. Langfit, New York, Sept. 4, 1951
109 717 Gen. Butner, New York, Sept. 5, 1951
718 Gen. Stewart, New York, Sept. 7, 1951
719 Gen. Taylor, New York, Sept. 10, 1951
720 Gen. Muir, New York, Sept. 21, 1951
721 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Sept. 26, 1951
722 Gen. Stewart, New York, Oct. 1, 1951
110 723 Gen. Taylor, New York, Oct. 4, 1951
724 Gen. Haan, New York, Oct. 9, 1951
725 Gen. Sturgis, New Orleans, Oct. 11, 1951
726 Gen. McRae, New York, Oct. 13, 1951
727 Gen. Muir, New York, Oct. 16, 1951
728 Gen. Hersey, New York, Oct. 17, 1951
729 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Oct. 20, 1951
111 730 Gen. Eltinge, New York, Oct. 29, 1951
731 Gen. Stewart, New York, Nov. 2, 1951
732 Gen. Greely, New Orleans, Nov. 6, 1951
733 Gen. Taylor, New York, Nov. 6, 1951
734 Gen. Haan, New York, Nov. 7, 1951
735 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Nov. 11, 1951
736 Gen. Muir, New York, Nov. 12, 1951
737 Gen. Ballou, New York, Nov. 14, 1951
112 738 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Nov. 16, 1951
739 Gen. Hersey, New York, Nov. 24, 1951
740 Gen. Stewart, New York, Nov. 29, 1951
741 Gen. Eltinge, New York, Nov. 30, 1951
742 Gen. Greely, New York, Dec. 4, 1951 
743 Gen. Taylor, New Orleans, Dec. 7, 1951
744 Gen. Muir, New York, Dec. 10, 1951
745 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Dec. 13, 1951
746 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Dec. 15, 1951
113 747 Gen. Heintzelman ' New York, Dec. 22, 1951
748 Gen. Ballou, New York, Dec. 23, 1951
749 Gen. Hersey, New York, Dec. 26, 1951
750 Gen. Eltinge, New York, Dec. 29, 1951
751 Gen. Stewart, New York, Jan. 2, 1952
752 Gen. Taylor, New York, Jan. 5, 1952
753 Gen. Greely, New York, Jan. 10, 1952
754 Gen. Muir, New York, Jan. 12, 1952
Box No. Folder No. Folder Title and Dates
114 755 Gen. Sturgis, New Orleans, Jan. 13, 1952
756 Gen. Blatchford, New York, Jan. 20, 1952
757 Gen. Stewart, New York, Jan. 27, 1952
758 Gen. Taylor, New York, Jan. 31, 1952
759 Gen. Muir, New York, Feb. 7, 1952
760 Gen. Haan, New York, Feb. 8, 1952
761 Gen. Sturgis, New York, Feb. 13, 1952
115 762 Gen. Blatchford, New Orleans, Feb. 19, 1952
763 Gen. Stewart, New York, Feb. 22, 1952
764 Gen. Related Materials, 1949-1952
Box No. Folder No. Folder Title and Dates
Subseries 2 Assurances for Polish Veterans in Great Britain
116 765 ACRPDP - Assurances for Veterans in Great Britain,
                1-150, Aug. 22-Sept. 12, 1950
766                 151-300, Sept. 12-Oct. 16, 1950
767                 301-450, Oct. 17-Nov. 14, 1950
768                 451-600, Nov. 16-Dec. 8, 1950
769                 601-750, Dec. 12, 1950-jan. 23, 1951
770                 751-900, Jan. 23-Feb. 20, 1951
771                 901-1050, March 1-19, 1951
117 772 ACRPDP - Assurances for Veterans in Great Britain,
               1051-1200,  March 13-April 1, 1951
773                1201-1350,  April 17-May 7, 1951
774                1351-1500,  May 7-25, 1951
775                1501-1650,  June 1-20, 1951
776                1651-1800,  June 20-July 6, 1951
777                1801-1900,  July 6-16, 1951
118 778 ACRPDP - Assurances for Veterans in Great Britain,
               1901-2000, July 16-Aug. 1, 1951
779                2001-2100, Aug. 1-15, 1951
780                2101-2200, Aug. 15-17, 1951
781                2201-2300, Aug. 17-24, 1951
782                2301-2400, Aug. 24-28, 1951
119 783 ACRPDP - Assurances for Veterans in Great Britain,
                2401-2500,  Aug. 28-Sept. 4, 1951
784                2601-2700,  Sept. 5-10, 1951
785                2701-2800,  Sept. 10-20, 1951
786                2801-2900,  Sept. 20-21, 1951
787                2901-3000,  Sept. 21-24, 1951
788                3001-3100,  Sept. 24-Oct. 25, 1951
120 789 ACRPDP - Assurances for Veterans in Great Britain,
               3101-3250, Oct. 30-Nov. 30, 1951
790                3251-3425, Nov. 30-Dec. 27, 1951
Subseries 3 Assurances by An Individual Sponsor (Refugee Relief Act of 1953)
121 791 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,    1-14, 1954-1956
792                                                        21-71, 1954-1957
793                                                        3-40, 1954-1955
794                                                        44-75, 1954-1955
795                                                        1-97,1956
796                                                        16, 19, 74-100,1954-1956
797                                                        2-105, 1956-1957
122 798 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,    81-120, 1954-1956
799                                                       103-138,  1954-1957
800                                                       121-158,  1954
801                                                       142-200,  1955-1956
802                                                       161-199,  1954-1955
803                                                       202-237,  1954-1955
123 804 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,   201-250,  1955-1956
805                                                       72, 213, 242-273,1954-1956
806                                                       251-285,  1952-1956
807                                                       286-298,  1955-1959
808                                                       290-320,  1955-1956
809                                                       301-340, 1955-1956
124 810 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,   321-358,  1955-1956
811                                                       341-375,  1955-1956
812                                                       362-398,  1955
813                                                       376-400,  1955-1957
814                                                       401-432,  1955-1956
815 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,   402-440, 1955
816                                                       433-459, 1955-1957
125 817 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,   442-497, 1955-1957
818                                                       461-500, 1955-1956
819                                                       483-518, 1955-1957
820                                                       502-547, 1955-1956
821                                                       521-560, 1955-1957
822                                                       550-599, 1954-1957
823                                                       561-600, 1955-1956
126 824 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,   601-639, 1956-1957
825                                                       602-685, 1956-1958
826                                                       641-680, 1955-1957
827                                                       686-720, 1955-1957
828                                                       721-796, 1955-1957
829                                                       757-840, 1955-1956
127 830 Assurances by an individ. Sponsor,   801-903, 1955-1957
831                                                       843-880, 1955
832                                                       881-920, 1955-1956
833                                                       923-960, 1954-1957
834                                                       922-999, 1955-1957
835                                                       961-997, 1956
836                                                      1003-1059, 1955-1957
128 837 Assurances by an Individ. Sponsor,  1001-1127, 1956-1957
838                                                      1065-1100, 1956-1958
839                                                       3-1176 and no number, 1954-1957
840 p. Wanda Michalska (z prosba o uzyskanie podpisow i wyslanie), 1955-1956

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